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Coffee is Not my Cup of Tea Mug in Green
Coffee is Not my Cup of Tea Mug in Green £7.95
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Tea is the Best Medicine - Emergency Tea Selection Gift Box
Tea is the Best Medicine - Emergency Tea Selection Gift Box from £14.95
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Where There's Tea, There's Hope - Mug in Purple
Where There's Tea, There's Hope - Mug in Purple £7.95
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Aromatic Black Chai
Aromatic Black Chai from £2.20
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Blackcurrant Burst Infusion
Blackcurrant Burst Infusion from £2.00
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Duchess Earl Grey
Duchess Earl Grey from £2.00
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Organic Jasmine
Organic Jasmine from £2.00
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Classic Tea - Tregothnan - 10 Pack TeaBags
Classic Tea - Tregothnan - 10 Pack TeaBags £3.60
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Japanese Sencha Green
Japanese Sencha Green from £2.20
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News

Appreciating Tea: Take your Tea Drinking to the Next Level!

April 23, 2014

Running a tea company I’m constantly surrounded by the statement, ‘I LOVE tea!’, or ‘Oh, goodness, I couldn’t live without tea’ – but here’s my question to you; how much do you really know about your tea, and do you know how to appreciate a really great new tea? Tea appreciation, especially in China, is something completely different to tea drinking; appreciating your tea takes the humble drink past the point of something you simply quaff in the morning to get you going, or your favourite accompaniment to biscuits. Tea appreciation is about really looking, smelling and tasting your tea, right from the dry leaf through to the aftertaste and thoughts about the tea you’ve finished. ‘Appreciating’ or ‘tasting’ tea...

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What is Green Tea?

April 22, 2014

In our previous blog post we explored how white tea is processed, and how it is the least processed for all teas, giving it the most natural appearance. Next up is green tea, which undergoes more processing than white tea, but less than oolong or black tea. As with all tea leaves, the process starts with the picking of the leaves from the Camelia sinensis, or tea bush. And, as with white tea, the leaves are then dried, normally naturally, to help them wither and reduce their water content. The tea leaves are normally withered for around 2-3 hours. The leaves are also sorted to remove any dead or yellowing leaves, and any debris from the picking process. The withered...

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